Camera Austria International

109 | 2010

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  • RIKE FRANK
    A conversation with Sarah Pierce
  • SARAH PIERCE
  • MARIA MUHLE
    Anna Artaker: History and Infamy
  • ANNA ARTAKER
  • ALLAN SEKULA
    Condé and Beveridge: ...The Red Guards Come and Go, Talking of Michelangelo
  • CONDÉ AND BEVERIDGE
  • HERTA WOLF
    The Mazarine Blue. For Manfred Willmann
  • MANFRED WILLMANN
  • JEFF DERKSEN
    Art and Cities during Mega-Events. On the Intersection of Culture, Everyday Live, and the Olympics in Vancouver and Beyond. Part II

Preface

Every issue of Camera Austria, including this one, the first for 2010, represents a process of reflection and cooperation framed by the time that goes into producing this publication. It is a very rewarding – and new – experience every time for all those involved to join the artists and authors in defining all the details of production required to translate the project into a magazine format, and we would like to thank everyone who played a part in making this issue for this willingness.
Rike Frank discusses with Dublin-based artist Sarah Pierce about her work, that for the most part comprises discursive formats such as interviews, discussions and texts. Pierce creates archives, initiates workshops and develops complex installations that are often centred on in-depth research processes. Her interest is on exploring the exhibition process itself, the organisation of material, the role of the display, and the combination of stories. Pierce’s conceptual practice, for which she has been using the title “The Metropolitan Complex” since 2003, stems from an understanding of artistic work as a contribution to socially relevant cultural production.
Maria Muhle presents the works of Austrian artist Anna Artaker. In the author‘s analysis, recognition and identification on the one hand, namelessness and invisibility on the other are two theoretical complexes that Artaker scrutinises in her work, above all in the realm of historiography. For example, she contrasts scenes from the 1956 historical film “Sissi” with photographs of the Soviet army‘s suppression of the Hungarian revolt (that took place the same year) in Budapest. Artaker works on a historiography that sets out to exhibit the mechanisms of identification and visualisation as mechanisms of power.

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Camera Austria International 109 | 2010
Preface

Every issue of Camera Austria, including this one, the first for 2010, represents a process of reflection and cooperation framed by the time that goes into producing this publication. It is a very rewarding – and new – experience every time for all those involved to join the artists and authors in defining all the details of production required to translate the project into a magazine format, and we would like to thank everyone who played a part in making this issue for this willingness.
Rike Frank discusses with Dublin-based artist Sarah Pierce about her work, that for the most part comprises discursive formats such as interviews, discussions and texts. Pierce creates archives, initiates workshops and develops complex installations that are often centred on in-depth research processes. Her interest is on exploring the exhibition process itself, the organisation of material, the role of the display, and the combination of stories. Pierce’s conceptual practice, for which she has been using the title “The Metropolitan Complex” since 2003, stems from an understanding of artistic work as a contribution to socially relevant cultural production.
Maria Muhle presents the works of Austrian artist Anna Artaker. In the author‘s analysis, recognition and identification on the one hand, namelessness and invisibility on the other are two theoretical complexes that Artaker scrutinises in her work, above all in the realm of historiography. For example, she contrasts scenes from the 1956 historical film “Sissi” with photographs of the Soviet army‘s suppression of the Hungarian revolt (that took place the same year) in Budapest. Artaker works on a historiography that sets out to exhibit the mechanisms of identification and visualisation as mechanisms of power.
The Canadian artist couple Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge have been collaborating since the late 1960s, when they were working in the context of the Art & Language group in New York before moving to Toronto, where they now live. Condé and Beveridge are authors of a political art that deals with questions of social justice, economic and ecological topics, and who deploy the photography medium in their enactments, photomontages and series in direct collaboration with activists and people affected. They have put together a selection of their multi-faceted work for Camera Austria. Allan Sekula, whose friendship with the two artists goes back to their time together in New York, has written an accompanying essay.
Work on this first issue of Camera Austria for 2010 coincided with some other important events at our institution: The exhibition “Sweet Talk. Commissions (Beirut)” is the first ever presentation of Lebanese artist Walid Raad‘s photos of Beirut, that he has been taking since the 1980s (commissioned by himself, as the title indicates): it is gratifying that Camera Austria – as a place of production and reflection on photography – can offer a commensurate setting for this new project. At the opening of this exhibition, Croatian artist Sanja Iveković was presented with the 2009 Camera Austria Award of the City of Graz. The award acknowledges an artist for whom photography constitutes an integral part of the critical conceptual approach underlying her socio-politically driven work. Lastly, at the beginning of February we opened the final showing of the exhibition “I am not afraid. The Market Photo Workshop in Johannesburg” (with which we celebrated our 100th issue ofCamera Austria in 2007) at the Johannesburg Art Gallery following presentations in Prague and Munich.
We would like to thank our readers and subscribers for your interest and hope you enjoy reading this issue.

Christine Frisinghelli
March 2010

Entries

Forum

ANJA SCHAFFNER

JEFF LUCKEY

FREDERIC LEZMI

KATHARINA KIEBACHER

LINN SCHRÖDER

GEORGIA CREIMER

DAVID SCHREYER

RICHARD MOSSE

Exhibitions

Migropolis: Venice / Atlas of a Global Situation
Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa Venedig
ANTONELLO FRONGIA

Gender Check. Rollenbilder in der Kunst Osteuropas
Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien
MAREN LÜBBKE-TIDOW

Das Museum als Durchgangsort. Apichatpong Weerasethakul: “Primitive”
Haus der Kunst München
CHRISTA BLÜMLINGER

Contour 2009 – Biennal of the Moving Image
Mechelen
ESPERANZA ROSALES

Coverversionen: Jack Smith und das Revival als Programm
Arsenal-Institut für Videokunst Berlin
KATHARINA SYKORA

Fotografie. Images Recalled. Bilder auf Abruf
Fotofestival Mannheim Ludwigshafen Heidelberg
STEFANIE DIEKMANN

László Moholy-Nagy. Retrospektive
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt am Main
ROLF SACHSSE

A Rebours (Against the Grain). Marc Camille Chaimowicz
Secession Wien
ANNE FAUCHERET

Robert Adams
Hasselbad Center Göteborg Art Museum
PHILIPP FREYTAG

Jules Spinatsch. Alpenglühn um Mitternacht
Foto Kunst Stadtforum, Innsbruck
MEIKE KRÖNCKE

Books

Birgit Jürgenssen
Ostfildern 2009
TANIA HÖLZL

Düsseldorf im Doppelpack. Stefan Gronert: Die Düsseldorfer Photoschule. Photographien von 1961 – 2008 / Die Düsseldorfer Schule. Photographien aus der Sammlung Lothar Schirmer
München 2009
THILO KOENIG

Heidi Harsieber: Immer schön brav
Salzburg 2009
MANISHA JOTHADY

These Young Ladies of the Republic… Ilse Frech: I am – Paradox Identity
Rotterdam 2009
MICHÉLE COHEN HADRIA

Imprint

Publisher: Manfred Willmann. Owner: Verein CAMERA AUSTRIA, Labor für Fotografie und Theorie.
All: Lendkai 1, A-8020 Graz.

Editors: Christine Frisinghelli, Daniela Billner, Tanja Gassler
Editor News section: Heidi Oswald

Copy editing: Theresa Haigermoser, Marie Röbl
English lectorate: Dawn Michelle d’Atri
Translations: John Doherty, Nicholas Grindell, Wilfried Prantner, David Quigley, Richards Watts.