Camera Austria International

122 | 2013

Price

16Add to cart

  • MICHELE ROBECCHI
    Shirana Shahbazi: The Deceiving Truth
  • SHIRANA SHAHBAZI
  • MARK DURDEN
    Wolfgang Tillmans: The Freedoms of Photography
  • WOLFGANG TILLMANS
  • VANESSA JOAN MÜLLER
    Stephanie Kiwitt: Promise of Use Value
  • STEPHANIE KIWITT
  • ÓSCAR FARIA
    Heinz Peter Knes: Claro Intelecto
  • HEINZ PETER KNES
  • T.J. DEMOS
    Spectro-Aesthetics 2/4 The World Without Us

Editorial

What can an individual image be, except good? This rhetorical-critical question repeatedly accompanies us when conceptualising the content of our magazine, where we attempt to foster discourse that clearly extends beyond the individual image—discourse that instead posits forms of documentation and, also, serial working approaches as the focus of reflection. The aim here is to consistently comprehend photographic practice as a form of critical commentary or as involvement in or visualisation of politics and everyday life.
Nevertheless, the case still remains that we repeatedly encounter pictures taken by artists whose works, though conceptually-strategically and self-evidently compiled as series in books and exhibitions for content-related reasons, indeed also offer lingering impressions and effects as individual images in and of themselves. They are photographs that captivate simply through their pictorial precision; works that primarily have impact due to their visuality rather than expressing something through approaches to visualising “something”; pictures that lay claim to an enduring validity while simultaneously eschewing both an immediate description of what we see there and a veiling theorisation.
The works of Wolfgang Tillmans are a good example of this. In no way is the cult surrounding images confirmed here—instead, it pays to grasp his photos as genre pictures. Expressed in his works is a form of (ethical) thinking about things, while at the same time the artist remains closely attuned to the object; images are not adjusted, nor are realities shifted. Tillmans’s photographs do not assume validity via a conceptive fundamental idea that interconnects the works but rather are, each “in itself”, precise descriptions of spaces and their atmospheres, which (especially in his more recent works) develop far beyond the visible depictions of surfaces and the related materiality. Sometimes this transpires by way of the pictorial carrier itself, the photo paper, and sometimes by way of the light active within, which references the many ends of the world and its inhabitants, whom Tillmans associates in this cycle.
The fact that behind each photographic image there has always been another image “waiting”, that (and how) photographic images offer reciprocal commentary, how their politics spans between the images, how a discourse is put into motion, how a thought finds its place in the images, and how social aspects are staged in the images—all of this rests in the discourse between “photo op” and “documentality”. Yet how do we behold one image? What takes shape in this particular detail? What transformations and translations take hold? On what form of presence and performativity is the one and only image based? It is not only Tillmans who codifies his photos with enigmatic stories—to be noted in the work of Heinz Peter Knes and Stephanie Kiwitt, for instance, is always a densification of that which in their series comes to play through references and acts of appropriation in the concrete individual image. They, too, know how to incisively organise in their works both form and aesthetics in the individual image.

 

Full text

Camera Austria International 122 | 2013
Editorial

What can an individual image be, except good? This rhetorical-critical question repeatedly accompanies us when conceptualising the content of our magazine, where we attempt to foster discourse that clearly extends beyond the individual image—discourse that instead posits forms of documentation and, also, serial working approaches as the focus of reflection. The aim here is to consistently comprehend photographic practice as a form of critical commentary or as involvement in or visualisation of politics and everyday life.
Nevertheless, the case still remains that we repeatedly encounter pictures taken by artists whose works, though conceptually-strategically and self-evidently compiled as series in books and exhibitions for content-related reasons, indeed also offer lingering impressions and effects as individual images in and of themselves. They are photographs that captivate simply through their pictorial precision; works that primarily have impact due to their visuality rather than expressing something through approaches to visualising “something”; pictures that lay claim to an enduring validity while simultaneously eschewing both an immediate description of what we see there and a veiling theorisation.
The works of Wolfgang Tillmans are a good example of this. In no way is the cult surrounding images confirmed here—instead, it pays to grasp his photos as genre pictures. Expressed in his works is a form of (ethical) thinking about things, while at the same time the artist remains closely attuned to the object; images are not adjusted, nor are realities shifted. Tillmans’s photographs do not assume validity via a conceptive fundamental idea that interconnects the works but rather are, each “in itself”, precise descriptions of spaces and their atmospheres, which (especially in his more recent works) develop far beyond the visible depictions of surfaces and the related materiality. Sometimes this transpires by way of the pictorial carrier itself, the photo paper, and sometimes by way of the light active within, which references the many ends of the world and its inhabitants, whom Tillmans associates in this cycle.
The fact that behind each photographic image there has always been another image “waiting”, that (and how) photographic images offer reciprocal commentary, how their politics spans between the images, how a discourse is put into motion, how a thought finds its place in the images, and how social aspects are staged in the images—all of this rests in the discourse between “photo op” and “documentality”. Yet how do we behold one image? What takes shape in this particular detail? What transformations and translations take hold? On what form of presence and performativity is the one and only image based? It is not only Tillmans who codifies his photos with enigmatic stories—to be noted in the work of Heinz Peter Knes and Stephanie Kiwitt, for instance, is always a densification of that which in their series comes to play through references and acts of appropriation in the concrete individual image. They, too, know how to incisively organise in their works both form and aesthetics in the individual image.
“The opportunity to physically reconfigure and market oneself may also be interpreted as yielding personal liberation beyond adaption to external pressures,” as Vanessa Joan Müller finds thematised in Stephanie Kiwitt’s series “GYM”, which also implies finding an appropriate photographic form for these attempts at reconfiguration. Of issue here is not only the seriality of this recurring and repeatedly renewing exertion as a documentary “motif” in the series; playing out here is also a conflict (between the body and the tuning thereof) that appears as a formal element in the individual images. An act of stepping out of the picture or a departure from the pictures is suggested, the alternation between colour and black-and-white, the varying repetition—the image emerges as an attempt to find a form and, by way of this form, to position the bodies as a performance instead of portraying them. Óscar Faria’s text on the work of Heinz Peter Knes, who in his photographs pictorially orbits a cabin and its disappearance, dedicating himself to a downright archaic topic with this “migration of forms”, especially traces the disparate moments: revealing a new story with each new picture, becoming enmeshed in contradictions, beginning again from another perspective. “there are no credible witnesses, nor the faintest clue.” The construed trails cannot be verified, the story wants to interlink but then again not, each image opens up a new possible context which, however, is reluctant to be contextualised. It is as if an image itself had sent the postcard: “I hate my past and that of others.” The present that remains is the present of the image and renews its performance.
Shirana Shahbazi’s artistic practice—ensuing from the tradition of iconography in her homeland of Iran, which it seeks to associate with the pictorial traditions of the “West” (studio portraiture, still lifes, landscape painting)—entails more than complex pictorial references. Beyond their meaning, her works are also distinguished by an “intrinsic beauty”, as Michele Robecchi writes. The visuality of photography can only be evaluated based on a multifaceted perspective, which would also encompass the term beauty. The duality of Shahbazi’s works—appearing both familiar and foreign in equal measure, both codified by a history and embodying a strong aesthetic presence—likewise aims to trigger a direct, almost physical reaction to her photographs.
We are pleased to report that we are now working together with a new distribution partner: Motto Distribution in Berlin, which through its collaboration with over 150 publishers represents a broad palette of art-related books, including many experimental book projects. Also, our new website recently went online, offering us enhanced opportunities for communicating and documenting our work and leading to more extensive information. You will soon find us at I Never Read, Art Book Fair in Basel (CH) and at Rencontres d’Arles (FR). Further presentations of the current issue of Camera Austria International will take place at Art Basel and LISTE (Basel).

Maren Lübbke-Tidow, Reinhard Braun
and the Camera Austria team
June 2013

 

Contributions

Forum

Presented by Igor Eškinja:

ALEJANDRO VIDAL

MIRIAM O`CONNOR

PETER PUKLUS

KASIA KLIMPEL

LAURIE KANG

SANDRA VITALJIĆ

Exhibitions

Nouvelles Impressions de Raymond Roussel
Palais de Tokyo, Paris
ANNE FAUCHERET

Former West: Documents, Constellations, Prospects
Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin
FATOŞ ÜSTEK

Haris Epaminonda: South of Sun
Kunsthaus Zürich
ANKE HOFFMANN

Rosemarie Trockel: A Cosmos
Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid
New Museum, New York
Serpentine Gallery, London
STEFANIE SEIBOLD

Rineke Dijkstra: The Krazy House
MMK, Frankfurt/Main
KERSTIN STREMMEL

Ruins in Reserve
Tate Modern Project Space, London
STEFAAN VERVOORT

Live Cinema/Manon de Boer: Resonating Surfaces – A Trilogy
Philadelphia Museum of Art
NICOLAS LINNERT

Ahlam Shibli: Phantom Home
MACBA, Barcelona
Jeu de Paume, Paris
Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Serralves, Porto
ALBERTO MARTÍN

Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc: Kannibalen
Bielefelder Kunstverein
BRITTA PETERS

Lewis Baltz
kestnergesellschaft, Hannover
Albertina, Wien
NORA THEISS

Power! Photos! Freedom!
FotoMuseum Provincie Antwerpen
TACO HIDDE BAKKER

Moments Measured
LACMA, Los Angeles
SANDRA WAGNER

I am also… Douglas Gourdon
Tel Aviv Museum of Art
ELLIE ARMON AZOULAY

Fotos. Österreichische Fotografien von den 1930ern bis heute
21er Haus, Wien
CHRISTINA NATLACEN

Concrete. Fotografie und Architektur
Fotomuseum Winterthur
HUBERTUS ADAM

Josef Dabernig: Panorama
Kunsthaus Graz
REINHARD BRAUN

59. Internationales Kurzfilmtage Oberhausen: Flatness. Kino nach dem Internet
KATRIN MUNDT

art is: new art. Reflections on Schönberg in contemporary art
Arnold Schönberg Center, Wien
YUKI HIGASHINO

Books

Ulrike Lienbacher: nude, pensive
Fotohof edition, Salzburg 2012
KRZYSZTOF PIJARKSI

Vera Brandner: Das Bild der Anderen / Picturing Others
Fotohof edition, Salzburg 2012
RUTH SONDEREGGER

THE REVOLVING BOOKSHELF
Hans-Dieter Schmidt / Evelyn Richter: Entwicklungswunder Mensch, Urania-Verlag, Leipzig / Jena / Berlin 1980
Friedl Kubelka: Porträt Louise Anna Kubelka, Edition Fotohof, Salzburg 1998
Judith Butler: Psyche der Macht. Das Subjekt der Unterwerfung, Suhrkamp Verlag, Frankfurt/Main 2001
JAN WENZEL

 

Imprint

Publisher: Reinhard Braun
Owner: Verein CAMERA AUSTRIA. Labor für Fotografie und Theorie.
Lendkai 1, 8020 Graz, Österreich
Editor-in-chief: Maren Lübbke-Tidow (V.i.S.d.P.)
Editors: Christina Töpfer, Margit Neuhold (maternity leave), Rebecca Wilton
Translators: Dawn Michelle d’Atri, John Doherty, Rui Parada, Wilfried Prantner, Josephine Watson.
German proofreading: Daniela Billner
English proofreading: Dawn Michelle d’Atri

Dank / Aknowledgements:
Carmen Brunner, Mark Durden, T. J. ­Demos, Igor Eškinja, Óscar Faria, ­Winfried ­Heininger, Sven Johne, ­Laurie Kang, Stephanie Kiwitt, Kasia Klimpel, Heinz ­Peter Knes, Eva Möller, Vanessa Joan Müller, Frauke Nelißen, Miriam O’Connor, Peter Puklus, Michele ­Robecchi, Fadoa Schurer, Shirana Shahbazi, ­Wolfgang Tillmans, Slaven Tolj, Alejandro Vidal, Sandra Vitaljić, Veronika Werkner, Stefanie Zangerl.

Copyright © 2013
Alle Rechte vorbehalten. Nachdruck nur mit vorheriger Genehmigung des Verlags. / All rights reserved. No parts of this magazine may be reproduced without publisher’s permission.

Für übermittelte Manuskripte und Originalvorlagen wird keine Haftung übernommen. / Camera Austria International does not assume any responsibility for submitted texts and original materials.

ISBN 978-3-900508-94-4
ISSN 1015 1915
GTIN 4 19 23106 1600 5 00121