Camera Austria International

125 | 2014

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  • TOBIAS ZIELONY
    Nan Goldin: A Conversation
  • NAN GOLDIN
  • MAREN LÜBBKE-TIDOW
    Seiichi Furuya: Border
  • SEIICHI FURUYA
  • KAUCYILA BROOKE
    Allan Sekula (January 15, 1951 – August 10, 2013)
  • ALLAN SEKULA
  • DAN BYERS
    Joachim Koester: Some Boarded Up Houses
  • JOACHIM KOESTER
  • ALANNA LOCKWARD
    Decolonising the (White) Gaze 1/4
    Who is Whipping?

Preface

The point of departure for the issue at hand partially originates with the history of the Camera Austria organisation itself. In 1989, the cultural department of the City of Graz made an offer, on the occasion of “150 Years of Photography”, to support larger-scale projects in order to emphasise the significance of contemporary photography in Graz. The first related exhibition was called “No. 1 Stadtpark”, which was accompanied by an eponymous publication; it presented those artists who were working in the area surrounding the Forum Stadtpark in Graz, to which Camera Austria also belonged at the time. What is more, the magazine’s publisher Manfred Willmann had the idea to confer an award (of which there were very few at the time, even internationally) to honour the photographic artists associated with Camera Austria who have made “a noteworthy contribution … in Camera Austria since 1980” (as the statute reads). In 1989, the Camera Austria Award for Contemporary Photography by the City of Graz was thus presented for the first time—to Nan Goldin. Since then, it has been awarded by an international jury every two years.
All other artists that we are (once again) introducing in this issue have, like Nan Goldin, been recipients of the Camera Austria Award: Seiichi Furuya (1993), Allan Sekula (2001), and Joachim Koester (2013).

In the current issue Alanna Lockward starts her series of essays, which over the course of this year will make up the Column section. In our view, her project “Decolonial Aesthetics/AestheSis” and the related decolonisation of the gaze already in this issue provides an important extended framework for discourse on modernism and its production of visibilities.

 

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Camera Austria International 125 | 2014
Preface

Three contributions by Nan Goldin have been published in our magazine since 1988: a letter from Christine Frisinghelli to the artist (1988), the facsimile of a handwritten obituary for Cookie Mueller (1992), and, not until issue No. 50, a text by Peter Schjeldahl about her portraits (1995). In a remarkable way, Goldin long resisted the coupling of text and image that is so characteristic for Camera Austria International. The first contribution mentioned above was published in the context of the exhibition and symposium “The Contemporary”, which also dealt with a “radicalization of the personal element in relation to this reality”. From today’s perspective looking back, Goldin’s contributions assert her presence, even when it comes to the opposition shown towards a discursive logic of utilisation. The artist Tobias Zielony—guest editor of issue No. 114 (2011)—met with Nan Goldin in Berlin in January 2014 for a conversation that now, after many years, has once again opened a context for her artwork. But even this discussion does not primarily touch on photography or art; it deals with people, their histories and fates, with drugs, love, and AIDS.
The point of departure for the issue at hand partially originates with the history of the Camera Austria organisation itself. In 1989, the cultural department of the City of Graz made an offer, on the occasion of “150 Years of Photography”, to support larger-scale projects in order to emphasise the significance of contemporary photography in Graz. The first related exhibition was called “No. 1 Stadtpark”, which was accompanied by an eponymous publication; it presented those artists who were working in the area surrounding the Forum Stadtpark in Graz, to which Camera Austria also belonged at the time. What is more, the magazine’s publisher Manfred Willmann had the idea to confer an award (of which there were very few at the time, even internationally) to honour the photographic artists associated with Camera Austria who have made “a noteworthy contribution … in Camera Austria since 1980” (as the statute reads). In 1989, the Camera Austria Award for Contemporary Photography by the City of Graz was thus presented for the first time—to Nan Goldin. Since then, it has been awarded by an international jury every two
years.
All other artists that we are (once again) introducing in this issue have, like Nan Goldin, been recipients of the Camera Austria Award: Seiichi Furuya (1993), Allan Sekula (2001), and Joachim Koester (2013). Seiichi Furuya counts among the founding members of Camera Austria; in 1975 he came to Graz from Vienna and took part in an exhibition programme at Forum Stadtpark. A portrait of his wife Christine graced the cover of the first issue of Camera Austria. The autobiographical archive created between 1978, the year the two met, and 1985, the year Christine committed suicide, forms the heart of Furuya’s oeuvre. However, in the current issue, Maren Lübbke-Tidow writes about a different pivotal work by Furuya that was created between 1981 and 1983 in Austria. “Staatsgrenze / Border” can be read as an attempt at surveying the space to which his migration to Europe led him, where Furuya has now been living for over thirty-five years, though still remaining a foreigner. Not only has a significant amount of time elapsed since these photographs were taken—also, the series deals with a very different (national) space in that the border has eminently shifted in meaning, while still retaining a semblance of its former import. Against this background the series gains topicality, especially because it makes it possible to project onto one another differing concepts of “border”.
The fact that Allan Sekula plays an important role in our work is likewise demonstrated by the fact that four of his contributions were published in our magazine between 1988 and 2002. Positioned at the heart of the Symposion über Fotografie XVI (Symposium on Photography XVI) in 1996, conceptualised in collaboration with the artist, was his pivotal project “Fish Story” from the previous year. The link between photography and economy in many of Sekula’s projects—from “Aerospace Folk Tales” (1973) to “TITANIC’s wake” (2000)—always saw photography itself as a form of production. In the artist’s most important essay, “The Traffic in Photographs” (1981), Sekula phrases this fundamental question: “Can traditional photographic representation, whether symbolist or realist in its dominant formal rhetoric, transcend the pervasive logic of the commodity form, the exchange abstraction that haunts the culture of capitalism?” His critique of photography thus has implied criticism of capitalist and postcapitalist society. Perhaps this is the reason why his work in the United States has seen little resonance to date, as recently lamented by Benjamin Buchloh: “The very criteria of this exclusion give us an astonishing insight, underscoring the fact that total depolitization appears to be the precondition of cultural recognition …” (Artforum International, January 2014). Since Sekula’s politicising way of approaching the photographic image has already been presented in our magazine several times, we asked Kaucyila Brooke, an old friend and colleague of Allan Sekula’s at the California Institute of the Arts, to write a personal text about his work.
The artistic work of Joachim Koester, the current award recipient for the year 2013, has also served as a reference point for us in previous years. In 2006 and 2009, we exhibited his series “Histories” (2003–05) and “Morning of the Magicians” (2005) in a two-part exhibition project on Conceptualism in photography. Of main focus here were questions about the relationship between image and knowledge as well as image and history. Such relations may also be considered to characterise Koester’s work, for various projects he has done in recent years repeatedly deal with revisiting neglected, almost forgotten events or historical contexts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His works often feature elements of an obscure, irrational, subconscious, or repressed nature as related to modernist development: spiritualism, occultism, drugs, failed projects. Yet Koester was not solely concerned with (again) making visible this “other” facet of modernism, but also with emphasising its significance for that which we call modernism. The same can be said of the series “Some Boarded Up Houses” (2009–14): “… he locates precise sites at the intersection of predatory lending practices, speculative capitalism, and a particularly American approach to the buying, selling, and acceptance of debt”, as Dan Byers notes in his essay about this work.
In the current issue Alanna Lockward starts her series of essays, which over the course of this year will make up the Column section. In our view, her project “Decolonial Aesthetics/AestheSis” and the related decolonisation of the gaze already in this issue provides an important extended framework for discourse on modernism and its production of visibilities.
In publishing the 125th edition of our magazine, it is once again high time to extend warm thanks to our subscribers, readers, and advertising partners for continuing to share our interest in the specific explorative questions that, in our opinion, can only be found in the joint context of photography and art. These are issues that can still be translated into the space of the magazine, despite this medium having aged somewhat considering that it now appears to be surrounded by countless online forms of publication and distribution. In our work, we still strongly appreciate the commitment to artistic positions, but also the opportunity to organise a field of visuality and knowledge in magazine form.

Reinhard Braun
and the Camera Austria Team
March 2014

 

 

Entries

Forum

Presented by the editors

Marc Shoul
Markus Henttonen
Magdalena Pilko
Ruggero Maramotti
Claudia Rohrauer
Flavio Pescatori

Exhibitions

Asco: No Movies
Nottingham Contemporary
de Appel arts centre, Amsterdam
CAPC Musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux
STEPHANIE SCHWARTZ

América Latina, 1960–2013
Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris
Museo Amparo, Puebla
ELLIE ARMON AZOULAY

Willie Doherty: Unseen
City Factory Gallery, Derry
JULIA GWENDOLYN SCHNEIDER

Clemens von Wedemeyer: The CastMAXXI, Rom
RAINER BELLENBAUM

Yevgenia Belorusets: Euromaidan – Besetzte Räume
Projektraum OKK, Berlin
RAIMAR STANGE

Elisabeth Neudörfl: unseen aspects of a city
Wien Lukatsch, Berlin
Natalie Czech: I Cannot Repeat What I Hear
Capitain Petzel, Berlin
Roman Schramm: Today’s Lies, Tomorrow’s Truths
Croy Nielsen, Berlin
Erica Baum: The Public Imagination
Lüttgenmeijer, Berlin
JENS ASTHOFF

Anna Artaker: Rekonstruktion der Rothschild’schen Gemäldesammlung in Wien
Arbeiterkammer, Wien
TILL GATHMANN

Dani Gal: Do you suppose he didn’t know what he was doing,
or knew what he was doing and didn’t want anyone to know?
Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen
ANKE HOFFMANN

Rabih Mroué: Image(s), mon amour
CA2M Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid
SALT Galata and SALT Beyoğlu, Istanbul
ALBERTO MARTÍN

Louise Lawler: Adjusted
Museum Ludwig, Köln
ELISABETH NEUDÖRFL

Markus Krottendorfer: Phantom of the Poles
Fotohof, Salzburg
CHRISTIAN EGGER

Map: Artistic Migrations and the Cold War
Zachęta Gallery, Warschau
JAKUB MAJMUREK

Christodoulos Panayiotou: Days and Ages
Moderna Museet Stockholm
ALEXANDER DE CUVELAND

Sharon Ya’ari: Leap Toward Yourself
Tel Aviv Museum of Art
REINHARD BRAUN

Barbara Probst
The National Museum of Photography, Copenhagen
JUDITH SCHWARZBART

Im Augenblick. Fotografien von Fred Stein
Jüdisches Museum, Berlin
RAINER BELLENBAUM

Anja Manfredi: Bewegungsbilder
OstLicht. Galerie für Fotografie, Wien
Ich bin eine andere Welt – künstlerische Autor_innenschaft
zwischen
Desubjektivierung und Rekanonisierung
xhibit, Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien
Mobilität III – Geld
Fotogalerie, Wien
Places of Transition
Freiraum quartier21, Wien
MANISHA JOTHADY

8. Biennale of Photography: The Passion of Photography – Focus On Afficionados
Poznań
JÖRG SCHELLER

Pierre Huyghe
Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris
Museum Ludwig, Köln
ANNE FAUCHERET

Books

Michael Danner: Critical Mass
Kehrer Verlag, Heidelberg 2013
ARAM LINTZEL

The Human Snapshot
LUMA Foundation, Feldmeilen
Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
Sternberg Press, Berlin 2013
TACO HIDDE BAKKER

Steffen Siegel: Ich ist zwei andere. Jeff Walls Diptychon aus Bildern und Texten
Wilhelm Fink Verlag, München 2014
ANNA HÄUSLER

Anton Holzer: Fotografie in Österreich.
Geschichten, Entwicklungen, Protagonisten 1890 – 1955

Metroverlag, Wien 2013
ROLF SACHSSE

THE REVOLVING BOOKSHELF
Richard Whelan: This is War! Robert Capa at Work
Steidl Verlag, Göttingen
International Center of Photography, New York 2007
Lee Miller: Der Krieg ist aus. Deutschland 1945
Elefanten Press, Berlin 1995
Margaret Bourke-White: Deutschland, April 1945 (Dear Fatherland Rest Quietly)
Schirmer/Mosel, München 1979
JAN WENZEL

Imprint

Publisher: Reinhard Braun
Owner: Verein CAMERA AUSTRIA. Labor für Fotografie und Theorie.
Lendkai 1, 8020 Graz, Österreich

Editors: Christina Töpfer, Margit Neuhold (maternity leave), Rebecca Wilton.

Translators: Dawn Michelle d’Atri, John Doherty, Wilfried Prantner, Josephine Watson.

German proofreading: Heidi Oswald
English proofreading: Dawn Michelle d’Atri

Acknowledgments: Kaucyila Brooke, Dan Byers, Mara Canela, Judith Carlton, Anna de Cassin, Max Cramer, Manon Engel, Vicky Godfrey, Nan Goldin, Seiichi Furuya, Marie Gellert Jensen, Markus Henttonen, Marieke Istha, Valentina Jager, Joachim Koester, Markus Krottendorfer, Alanna Lockward, Ruggero Maramotti, Flavio Pescatori, Maren Lübbke-Tidow, Anna Mándoki, Marta Miś, Martin Mlineritsch, Elisabeth Neudörfl, Magdalena Pilko, Magdalena Popławska, Claudia Rohrauer, Katie Shapiro, Marc Shoul, Roman Schramm, Sally Stein, Ina Steiner, Robert Stürzl, Clemens von Wedemeyer, Sylvia Winkler, Sharon Ya’ari, Theresia Ziehe, Tobias Zielony.

 

Copyright © 2014
All rights reserved. No parts of this magazine may be reproduced without publisher’s permission.
Camera Austria International does not assume any responsibility for submitted texts and original materials.

ISBN 978-3-902911-07-0
ISSN 1015 1915
GTIN 4 19 23106 1600 5 00125